Artist’s Statement:

Ephemera is a metaphor for humans connecting with both inner and external nature. In these portraits, ephemera is motivated by exploring the body in relation to the sheet as a place of intimacy with the self and in relation to others, in an attempt to find a balance between solitude and the need for the other.

These figures with their identities obscured emerge from performed gestural strategies to record and observe different archetypes of communication through body language within various emotional states.

The draping of the body and obscuring of the identity enable archetypes to become the foreground elements of an open reading. The sheet is an extension of ourselves that protects and moves with the body while projecting its transformative shape and expressing changes. It evokes symbols: from robes present in religions and rituals and draped fabric represented throughout art history on statues and in paintings, to the idea of draping something precious or sacred, and finally an allusion to the social fabric connecting all life beings.

The work explores themes contained within life’s inner core: observed mechanisms within human nature through different themes like transformation cycles, changing processes, memories, archetypes, psychological states, communication, and the body’s vitality.

 

 

Connecting
Connecting © Annie Bouvrette

 

Encounter
Encounter © Annie Bouvrette

 

Ephemera diptych
Ephemera diptych   © Annie Bouvrette

 

Sheets moving 2
Sheets moving 2 © Annie Bouvrette

 

Unnamed
Unnamed © Annie Bouvrette

 

Unnamed
Unnamed © Annie Bouvrette

 

Unnamed
Unnamed © Annie Bouvrette

 

Unnamed
Unnamed © Annie Bouvrette

 

Unnamed
Unnamed © Annie Bouvrette

 

Unnamed
Unnamed © Annie Bouvrette

 

Sheets moving 1
Sheets moving 1 © Annie Bouvrette

 

 

“In cartoons I value symbolism and imagination. Cartoons for me are real art. By the way, I don’t like the word « cartoon ». I prefer « humor in art » or witty drawings with meaning. I respect all graphic techniques – etching, silk-screens, lithography. I love all materials. It is just a question of figuring out which material suits my idea and how to use it for my art.”     From Montréal Serai Archives Vol. 19 No. 3.

©
© Oleh Derhachov

 

serray1
© Oleh Derhachov

 

serray3
© Oleh Derhachov

 

 

serray4
© Oleh Derhachov

 

Oleh Derhachov has been a professional artist since 1980. He graduated with Master of Fine Arts degree in 1984 from the Ukrainian Academy. He has won more than 85 prizes in international cartoon contests around the world, and his work is displayed in London, Paris, Moscow and Montréal. The idea of evoking positive, light-hearted emotions in our difficult and stressful times is a central theme for him. Oleh is an art director, teacher, artist, sculptor, cartoonist, illustrator and animator.

Art work: http://www.cartoongallery.eu/englishversion/gallery/canada/oleg-dergachov/

Montréal studio: http://synstudio.ca/oleg-dergachov/

 

Sorry, Future Generations - Montréal street art by Lily Luciole
Sorry, Future Generations – Montréal street art by Lily Luciole
Beyond fault lines - Montréal street art by Monk
Beyond fault lines – Montréal street art by Monk.E

 

Complex fault lines - Montréal street art
Complex fault lines – Montréal street art

 

Fault lines masked and unmasked- Montréal street artist KAT
Fault lines masked and unmasked- Montréal street artist KAT

 

Human animal fault lines - Montréal street artist KAT
Human animal fault lines – Montréal street artist KAT

 

Poetic dream fault lines - Montréal street art
Poetic dream fault lines – Montréal street art

 

Poseidon fault lines - Montréal street art by OMEN
Poseidon fault lines – Montréal street art by OMEN

 

Pregnant guerrilla street art by Enzo Sarto
Pregnant guerrilla street art by Enzo Sarto

 

Stop the hate fault lines - Montréal street art
Stop the hate fault lines – Montréal street art

 

Uniting over fault lines_Little Burgundy street art, Montréal
Uniting over fault lines – Little Burgundy street art, Montréal

 

Above and below the fault line : Montréal street artist OMEN
Above and below the fault line : Montréal street artist OMEN

Below is a poem by Nilambri Ghai that was inspired by the mural Above and below the fault line by Montréal Artist OMEN.

 

Nilambri Ghai poem The one that is not

Nilambri lives and writes in Ottawa, but her heart is in Montréal.

All photos by Jody Freeman

Through art I express my joys and sorrows, doing what, to me, is survival and communication. I do art to find myself. Art is a conversation with my inner self and a way of sharing with others, ‘for better or for worse,’ as they say.

1. Fantasy at Fenwick, Ink on paper, 11 inches x 7 1/2 inches, 2011
1. Fantasy at Fenwick, Ink on paper, 11 inches x 7 1/2 inches, 2011
New Jersey Blues 01, Acrylics and wax crayons on wood panel, 12 inches x 12 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues 01, Acrylics and wax crayons on wood panel, 12 inches x 12 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues 02, Acrylics and wax crayons on wood panel, 12 inches x 9 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues 02, Acrylics and wax crayons on wood panel, 12 inches x 9 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues 03, Acrylics and wax crayons on wood panel, 18 inches x 24 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues 03, Acrylics and wax crayons on wood panel, 18 inches x 24 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues 06, Acrylics and wax crayons on wood panel, 20 inches x 20 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues 06, Acrylics and wax crayons on wood panel, 20 inches x 20 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues Diptych 04, Acrylics on masonite, 16 1/2 inches x 10 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues Diptych 04, Acrylics on masonite, 16 1/2 inches x 10 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues Diptych 05, Acrylics on wood panel, 10 inches x 8 inches, 2013
New Jersey Blues Diptych 05, Acrylics on wood panel, 10 inches x 8 inches, 2013
Plodes I, Watercolour and ink on paper, 8 1/2 inches x 9 inches, 2016
Plodes I, Watercolour and ink on paper, 8 1/2 inches x 9 inches, 2016
Watercolour and ink on paper, 9 inches x 12 inches, 2016
Watercolour and ink on paper, 9 inches x 12 inches, 2016

 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Our bed, our bread


I often find myself remarking correlations between subjects of a different order: a vertebral column and a plant’s stem, a seed and an animal’s sex organs, a fruit and a musical instrument.

I ask myself:

— What is it that makes these forms look irrelevant, while other times seem so familiar?

— How can I broaden my understanding of their kinship?

— What are these forms searching to become? What are they changing into?

These questions become then my raw materials.  My work focuses on exploring these morphological (what does it look like), ontological (what is it on the whole) and perhaps spiritual (where is it going) aspects.

I think of the space my works create as universes which hold other ones within them. That may explain the reason I am attracted by the oval, a shape reminiscent of an egg, a seed, a galaxy or any other embryonic world.

The last 6 years I have been working mainly in print media. Printmaking is for me a truly vivid and organic practice, in which the printing matrix turns alive, gets transformed into a reproductive organ, generates life. The combination of different techniques — lithography, etching, woodcut — allows me to take advantage of the particular aesthetics of each process and to obtain images of rich and varied textures. I rarely follow a preconceived plan of action; instead, I prefer to experiment freely, to welcome any unexpected outcomes and to make my works evolve until the last printed variant.

 

Excercise artists handbook 2008
Excercise artists handbook 2008

 

Un masque de l Invisible 2012 print and plate
Un masque de l Invisible 2012 print and plate

 

Semence qui germe 2012
Semence qui germe 2012

 

INSTRUMENT V VAR I VII
Instrument V VAR I VII

 

Instrument 2014
Instrument 2014

 

Instrument II 2014
Instrument II 2014

 

Dipole 2007
Dipole 2007

 

Konstantinos Meramveliotakis was born in Athens, Greece in 1984. He has a BFA degree in painting from the Athens School of Fine Arts and a certificate in education from the Université de Montréal. Since the completion of his first artist’s book at the University of Barcelona in 2007, he has been predominantly working in print media. His work has been shown in several exhibitions in Greece and Canada and his prints can be seen at the collections of the BAnQ and L’Institut Canadien de Québec. A member of Atelier Circulaire printmaking studio since 2012, he participated in the 2014 Art Souterrain Festival with the collective print installation “the Corridor,” a variant of which will be exhibited this year at the Presse Papier Gallery in Trois-Rivières. He has lived in Montreal since 2009 and works at the Visual Arts Centre as a drawing and painting instructor.

Portfolio: http://meramveliotakis.com/

Teaching: http://www.visualartscentre.ca/details/category/teachers/konstantinos-meramveliotakis/

 

 

Andreanne Bouchard_Des cornets comme des fleurs 2015-09

 

 

Le projet des cornets s’est amorcé en 2013 alors que l’artiste avait fixé sur sa bicyclette un petit atelier de sérigraphie. En déambulant dans les rues, cette installation avait pour but de sortir l’atelier des murs et de permettre aux passants de découvrir la sérigraphie tout en prenant part à l’impression. Pour l’occasion, la matrice à imprimer était un cornet de crème glacée. Il s’agissait d’un clin d’œil au ice cream man à bicyclette, présent dans les parcs en saison estivale.

Cette image du cornet de crème glacée et ce petit atelier à vélo ont donné matière à réflexion puis est venue l’idée de dénaturer l’objet. Le champ de fleurs est ainsi devenu un champ de cornets de crème glacée multicolore et la bicyclette champêtre a fait place à une bicyclette-atelier. Cette œuvre fut présentée à Arprim lors de la Nuit Blanche 2014. Encore une fois, les visiteurs étaient invités à imprimer leur cornet et à le déposer dans le champ afin de mieux le garnir.

Andréanne Bouchard réutilise plusieurs fois les mêmes images/objets dans son travail; elle leur fait une place d’œuvre en œuvre, tels quels ou retaillés. Les cornets ont été exposés sous forme de tapisserie (Atelier-Galerie Alain Piroir-2014), de balconnières (Cirque du Soleil-2014), de chute de glaces (Espace Projet-2014), d’installation ludique (Centre Pauline Julien-2015) et finalement sous forme de fleurs pour agrémenter un petit jardin de la rue Marquette en septembre 2015 lors des Journées de la culture à Montréal.

Au total, plus de 3000 cornets et boules de crème glacée ont été imprimés, découpés, pliés, collés et chiffonnés.

 

Andreanne Bouchard_Des cornets comme des fleurs 2015-09
Des cornets comme des fleurs 2015

 

2014-03_BouchardAndréanne_Champdecornets_Arprim-6
Champ de cornets 01 (crédit photo Caroline Cloutier)

 

Andréanne Bouchard_champ de cornets 201403 (crédit photo Caroline Cloutier)
Champ de cornets 02 (crédit photo Caroline Cloutier)

 

2014-03_BouchardAndréanne_Champdecornets_Arprim-4
Champ de cornets 03 (crédit photo Caroline Cloutier)

 

tapisserie de cornets 2
Champ de cornets

 

tapisserie de cornets 3
Champ de cornets

 

Chute de glaces_Espace projet
Chute de glaces – Espace projet

 

Les cornets_Centre Pauline Julien
Les Cornets – Centre Pauline Julien

 

Originaire de Causapscal (Québec), Andréanne Bouchard est diplômée du baccalauréat en Arts Visuels et Médiatiques (UQAM, 2005). Elle a ensuite entrepris des études en Design Graphique (UQAM, 2010) afin de parfaire sa recherche picturale et satisfaire sa curiosité dans le domaine de l’imprimé. Font partie de son expérience artistique une résidence à Open Studio à Toronto et deux participations à la Biennale Internationale d’Estampe Contemporaine de Trois-Rivières. Ses œuvres ont entre autre été vues dans plusieurs expositions collectives et plus récemment à ARPRIM, à l’Atelier-Galerie A.Piroir ainsi qu’au Centre Pauline Julien. Elle est membre active de l’atelier Graff à Montréal depuis 2005.

La sérigraphie est omniprésente dans le travail d’Andréanne Bouchard, bien que ce soit le dessin qui structure ses œuvres. Que ce soit par des installations avec impression sur papier, par le collage ou par l’estampe plus traditionnelle, l’artiste recherche constamment un équilibre fragile dans ses compositions. Quelque part entre chaos et la finesse, l’artiste dévoile un univers subtil qui joue avec sa propre frivolité.

 

20151116_153309

Portrait of Nina Simone, heart blazing, on Jeanne Mance St., by Montréal street artist (and jazz singer) MissMe, who describes herself as “an artful vandal.” For more on MissMe, go to her website at http://www.miss-me-art.com/. (Photo by Jody Freeman)

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Anonymous mural photo of South Asian school girls on an industrial building in the old textile neighbourhood of Mile End (Casgrain St.) (Photo by Jody Freeman)

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20151021_175101
Mural by Hsix (Carlos Oliva) honouring Lea Roback

Lea Roback, portrayed here as a young union organizer in the 1930s in this unsigned mural in Montréal’s Mile End. She fought for women’s, workers’ and immigrants’ rights – for social justice and universal access to education – and was active in the peace movement. Even into her 80s, Lea was always turning up on picket lines and marches, and she encouraged young people in their social activism and artistic endeavours. On her 90th birthday, the Lea Roback Foundation was created to award scholarships to socially-committed low-income women in Québec. http://www.fondationlearoback.org/home.htm (Photo by Jody Freeman)